Nat Sherman Unveils Daniel Marshall Custom Humidors

Humidors & Vintage NY License Plates, gotta have one: GIFT!

FineTobaccoNYC

News from our friends over at Nat Sherman, via the blog of Michael Herklots:

In partnership with Daniel Marshall, we are proud to offer these beautiful custom humidors featuring Vintage New York License Plates.  The humidors are each one of a kind, with a hand carved design, Spanish Cedar lining, and come equipped with Humidification and a Hygrometer.  The humidors hold 125 Cigars, and are available exclusively at the Nat Sherman Townhouse, 12 East 42nd Street, in New York City.  Call  646-442-1850 for more information. ($1,595)

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Humanatarian & Princess, Mum, Royal

After 15 years, Diana will still be mourned by hundreds in UK

After 15 years, Diana will still be mourned by hundreds in UK.

The Nuclear Sacrifice of Our Children by Dr. Helen Caldicott

We must live for future generations, our future & responsibilty expands when our children turn 18!

Impressions

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By Helen Caldicott

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When I visited Cuba in 1979, I was struck by the number of roadside billboards that declared ”Our children are our national treasure.”

This resonated with me as a pediatrician, and of course it is true. But as Akio Matsumura said in his article, our children are presently being sacrificed for the political and nuclear agenda of the United Nations, for the political survival of politicians who are mostly male, and for “national security.”

The problem with the world today is that scientists have left the average person way behind in their level of understanding of science, and specifically how the misapplication of science, in particular nuclear science, has and will destroy much of the ecosphere and also human health.

The truth is that most politicians, businessmen, engineers and nuclear physicists have no innate understanding of radiobiology and the way radiation induces cancer, congenital…

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DIY Hanky Embroidery

42. Crying

I was taught NOT to cry, totally unacceptable, no exceptions! Except…

 

 

THOUSAND THOUGHTS

When I was little, my mom cried a lot. I would find her in the basement behind the water heater and the flower press, crying. It was terrifying to see her crying, but there was an intimacy in sitting with her as she did. Those were emotional days. There was a lot going on. My mom was pregnant, working full time, and taking care of my brother and I. There was a lot of family drama, too.

Anyways, when I was a teenager I was introduced to the idea that crying was a form of manipulation. Crying is what women did when they wanted to evade responsibility for something they had done. Crying was weakness, it was fear. These messages came from all over. Some of them were direct, as in actual words coming out of actual mouths of actual, albeit confused, people. They came from all walks of life…

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Cassava: Does it hold the secret to climate change adaptation?

Cassava or Yucca to the natives:

Repeating Islands

Lorianna De Giorgio (Toronto Star) writes that Cassava, a starchy root, has fed some of the poorest nations for centuries” and has proven to be highly resistant to adversity. See excerpts here.

Hundreds of millions of people in Africa depend on it, as do hundreds of millions more in Asia and Latin America. According to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization, cassava accounts for a third of Africans’ total caloric intake.  It may soon become even more important: New research suggests it is ideally suited to withstand drought and climate change.

‘Rambo’ of food

Andy Jarvis of the Colombia-based non-profit International Center for Tropical Agriculture, says cassava could be the answer to climate change adaptation in Africa, because cassava is “often the food crop that continues to provide food in periods of the year when other food sources are not available.” Its other selling point? It’s incredibly…

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